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Pirates of the Caribbean - Dead Man's Chest - Baroque Period

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
Photo: Disney

The Baroque Period (1603 -1750)

The Baroque Period begins with Queen Elizabeth’s death in 1603. It then ends in 1750 with the death of composer, Johann Sebastian Bach. While the Baroque era technically focuses on a particular period of music, we believe it is also a great way to distinguish the changing of times.

This particular era also covers early American History. Thus, some reviews may include Early America, the Mayflower Compact, Salem witches, and the majority of America’s Colonial Period before the rising of a revolution.

Outside of the European and American world, our period drama reviews once again include historical dramas set in Asian countries. Keep an eye out for Chinese dramas set during the end of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). Later period dramas are set during the beginning of the Qing (Ch’ing) Dynasty (1644-1912). Then there are the Korean dynasties. You may come across dramas set during the middle of the very long Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910).

Note: As always, the content on our site has a more old-fashioned theme and focuses more on PG-13 content or below. Anything Rated R or rated TV-MA will get a content warning in the review.

Be sure to check out the other historical eras from our main page of the Period Drama Review Archives. From Ancient, Regency, WWI, to Victorian, there are several period dramas just waiting for you to check out!

Period Drama Reviews Sorted By Historical Era

The Baroque Period Drama Reviews (1603 -1750)

 

The Baroque Period - A Little Chaos

“A Little Chaos” Photo: BBC Films

THE SILVER PETTICOAT REVIEW

The Silver Petticoat Review covers both classic and modern entertainment from around the world and specializes in Old-Fashioned Romance, Period Dramas, and Romantic Storytelling in Film, Literature, & TV. Our objective is to promote and bring back enthusiasm for swoon-worthy love stories and diverse storytelling steeped in or influenced by Romanticism without the excess of explicit content and unsentimental cynicism.

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