Category: Reviews

‘The Bitter Tea of General Yen’ Review – See One of the First Interracial Romances on Screen

Directed by Frank Capra, The Bitter Tea of General Yen is a relatively forgotten pre-Code film with social relevance, religious cynicism, violence, and a shocking interracial romance between a Chinese warlord and a Christian missionary. Indeed, this is not the type of movie one thinks of when referencing a Capra classic. It’s a Wonderful Life it is not. But that’s what makes this movie so fascinating. Not only is it different from Capra’s later films, but it’s also a love story ahead of its time.

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‘Welcome 2 Life’ Review: This is a Fun New Fantasy Romance to Watch

The eagerly anticipated Korean drama starring Rain (big heartthrob in my eyes), Welcome 2 Life, is a fantasy drama not to be missed. With only 32 episodes to digest, the series feels all too brief. But it’s a Korean Drama worth watching. Welcome 2 Life includes suspense, humor, and my favorite – supernatural forces at work. With the combination of action and adventure but also love and family, the show has a well-rounded appeal.

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Coming Home (1998) Review: A Solid WWII Period Drama With Fine Performances

Coming Home (1998) is an ITV miniseries based upon Rosamunde Pilcher’s coming-of-age story of the same name. The series is set during World War II (pre and post as well) in England. It follows about a decade of the life and loves and travails of schoolgirl Judith Duncan, who comes of age as war erupts.

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Review: Downton Abbey is the Period Drama Movie of the Year

Downton Abbey may have ignited a new age in cinema, proving going to the movies can still be a magical experience. The Downton Abbey movie (written by creator Julian Fellowes) is glamourous, nostalgic, funny, romantic, clever, heartbreaking, and entertaining. It’s everything you expect to see in an excellent period flick. Will it make complete sense if you haven’t seen the TV show? Maybe not. But it’s not hard to follow and even Downton newbies in the audience were entertained. But what made the film ultimately so special was the experience itself.

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