Christmas Cure

The Christmas Cure Film Review

July is kind of a “big deal” for Hallmark Channel. During this humid and hot summer month, they debut their timeless Christmas ornament collection for the season. While they also give us this debut, they keep us in the Christmas spirit with their first Christmas movie debut, The Christmas Cure.

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Dr. Vanessa “Nessa” Walker (Brooke Nevin) is thriving in her chosen career as a doctor. Living in California, she leads a solitary personal life, but all her sacrifices have paid off. She’s on the shortlist for the head of the ER in her prestigious hospital and for the first time in a long time, she’s been given the holidays off. This means she’s ready to fly back to her hometown for a much-needed family Christmas.

Back home, she discovers her father (Patrick Duffy), also a doctor, is preparing to retire. This news changes how she views everything, from the past that shaped her choices to the future before her. More questions come up when, while visiting her family, she also reconnects with her ex-boyfriend, Mitch (Steve Byers), the one guy who always seemed to know just what Nessa needed.

Given the temperatures and outdoor activities we ordinarily associate with the summer months, thoughts of warm fires or tree trimming are probably not foremost on our minds. Still, if there is one thing the Hallmark Channel does well, it’s romance. When they mingle some festive cheer to the mix, there’s even more to smile at.

Christmas Cure

Aside from the story and its script, many faces in front of the camera will be familiar. Whether it’s Brooke Nevin (Come Dance at Our Wedding, Journey Back to Christmas) or Steve Byers (Catch a Christmas Star), the sense of familiarity is present. Of course, Patrick Duffy will look familiar to Dallas fans. Here he plays a likable and wise father character, and as is their brand, Hallmark’s ensemble cast is memorable. Each one brings likability to their characters.

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What hones this feeling is the teasing and “easy” nature of the family life between the characters. This includes the fun relationship Nessa has with her little brother (who’s just graduated high school) and the genuine feel the bond in the Walker family inspires. As an added bonus, Nessa’s brother has a crush on a patient, which is always cute. The romance in this story isn’t as dynamic as its peers. I’m not sure if it was the story or something else. Nonetheless, this in no way disrupts the enjoyment of the story.

If you’re looking to enjoy a little “Christmas in July” fun, The Christmas Cure is perfect. As Hallmark’s first of 2017 “Countdown to Christmas” (their official Christmas program tagline) offering, this is sure to put a smile on your face. The Christmas cheer doesn’t go overboard, but it might leave you humming a Christmas tune or two.

Content: The Christmas Cure contains nothing offensive. It’s rated TV-G.

Where to Watch: At this time, Hallmark has no additional showtimes scheduled. However, I’d guess The Christmas Cure will again air over the holidays, so check your local listings come November.


Photos: Hallmark Channel / Crown Media Press

OVERALL RATING

Four corset rating

“Hello, Gorgeous.”

ROMANCE RATING

three heart rating

“Happiness in marriage is entirely a

matter of chance.”

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