vintage featured image old-fashioned


vintage featured image old-fashioned; The Silver Petticoat Review

The Silver Petticoat Review was started by twin sisters and a close friend – all with a vision in mind. To discuss the type of entertainment we all love in the hopes of finding kindred spirits with similar interests.

So, why the name, The Silver Petticoat Review, you might be thinking?

Well, the three of us battled out various names we felt represented who we were best. And in our naivety, even at one point came up with a name everyone else believed to be inappropriate sounding! So that was quickly tossed aside. But eventually, we all agreed upon The Silver Petticoat Review. For one, it had a nice ring! And two, it referenced what we were about – if in a hidden way.

The silver aspect of our name stems from the beauty and magic of the color. It’s that silver sparkle that represents our interest in fantasy, supernatural stories, and fairy tales. Beyond that, it’s also referring to the silver screen and classic film.

Petticoat refers to a fashion that was popular in a bygone era. The petticoat references our interest with film & literature of the past. Or period dramas/historical fiction that takes place in the past. Plus, how can anyone take a site “too” seriously with petticoat in the title? We hope the petticoat reveals a bit of our witty, fun, and fashionable sides!

And then “Review.” We decided a “Review” site would suit us best rather than say a journal. And we wanted to be more than just a blog. Our vision was closer to a blogazine. An amalgamation of a blog, an online magazine and a literary/film journal.

Altogether, we felt the name ringed true to our vision. We feel it represents both our serious side and our fun, flirty side (in a wholesome Jane Austen kind of way).

We put together the site, mostly on our own, and launched. It’s been an adventure since then. We have gone through three different designs, some amazing bloggers joined us along the way, our content has evolved, and we have over time adjusted our vision.

Creating The Silver Petticoat Review has been (and will continue to be) a journey of self-discovery. We found aspects of our site that worked, aspects that didn’t (and adjusted), and learned more about what we are passionate about. And, at times, we have really been surprised by some of these discoveries.

WHERE WE ARE TODAY

So that brings us to today. You may have noticed that recently we updated our site to its third design. There are still some kinks to work out but we hope you like it. We’ve made the site more social media friendly with a more open, clean design. It’s also wider and hopefully easier to read. The colors are vintage inspired to give it an old-fashioned feel with a responsive modern design that is easy to navigate.

On our journey of self-discovery (and finding our voice as a blogazine) we once again find ourselves better able to express what The Silver Petticoat Review is all about. Sure, we always knew it was an entertainment blogazine with a special focus on period dramas, classics, fairytales, and romance. However, in the beginning, we were too broad. We covered more than what we were actually interested in. So we have narrowed our focus.

WHO ARE WE NOW?


To review, here is our past Vision:

“The Silver Petticoat Review is a hybrid online magazine with a vintage design that is a mix between a blog, an entertainment magazine and a literary/film journal. We cover both classic and modern film, literature, theater and television in a fun and fashionable way while also striving to focus on less vulgar content that ignites the imagination and inspires the “Romantic” soul.

In all, we hope to not quite be high-brow or pretentious, as we like to have a bit of geeky fun, but we’re also not low brow. So think of us as something in-between.”

But we’ve decided to make some changes.

Introducing our new Vision:

The Silver Petticoat Review is a hybrid online magazine with a vintage design that is a mix between a blog, an entertainment magazine and a literary/film journal. We discuss both classic and modern film, literature, theater, and television in a fun and fashionable way.

While we cover different categories, The Silver Petticoat Review specializes in stories with old-fashioned romance and/or old-fashioned storytelling at the center.

In all, we hope to not quite be high-brow or pretentious, as we like to have a bit of geeky fun, but we’re also not low brow. So think of us as something in-between.

Old-Fashioned Romance Checklist – As Defined By Us:old-fashioned romance
  • Focus on soul connection rather than shallow attraction
  • Love over lust.
  • Focus on emotional growth rather than sex. Not that sex is always absent – just that when it’s used, it is necessary to the story and is (typically) off screen, implied or happening after the story has ended.
  • A meeting of the minds
  • The romantic duo are often kindred spirits
  • Smoldering Stares are involved
  • Swoon Worthy romantic moments (could be saving each other in non-damsel in distress fashion (i.e. the female is not a whimpering fool though she and he can both be saved by the other)
  • A touch of the hand is powerful.
  • As is a hug. Or a dance. Or the touch of a cheek.
  • A kiss is emotional and romantic often with some sort of build up
  • The male hero ‘usually’ (definite exceptions) have old-fashioned manners of some kind (though he can still seem rude or arrogant: think of Darcy for instance or just plain villainous like Heathcliff who returns like a devil in well-mannered disguise)
  • Male hero is not lazy and/or unambitious
  • Chivalry exists.
  • This is not about modern dating (though some of those can still use old-fashioned elements and make the cut. Hello, You’ve Got Mail is genius!)
  • The story is typically more than just about romance.
  • Happy Endings are possible – though not always expected. Tragedy is also acceptable.
  • Both characters are layered and worth reading and/or watching

Technically, any genre can tell a story with old-fashioned romance attached. Scully and Mulder from The X-Files are a perfect example. And sometimes (especially with TV Shows), old-fashioned romance can be used one episode and then not the next. Or in movies – in one scene but not the next. We’re interested in discussing and promoting old-fashioned romance in a movie, book, or show – even if it doesn’t last! However, we are MORE interested in content that regularly explores old-fashioned romance rather than making it the exception.

Yes, BBC Period Dramas based on classic novels and K-Dramas are our kindred spirits!

RELATED  The Appeal of the Old-Fashioned Romance

Old-Fashioned Storytelling As Defined By Us:

books

  • Written more like a Jane Austen, Dickens, or Charlotte Bronte novel than a bodice ripper. (Now we know it’s rare to find this kind of artistic skill, but the idea remains!)
  • The beauty of language is explored. These are Gilmore Girls-esque and not like an HBO special.
  • Idealism, Romanticism, and Realism are all acceptable
  • While realism is acceptable and even appreciated when relevant, the inclusion of excessive profanity, violence, and explicit sexuality is typically absent.
  • Written or Directed with an understanding of good storytelling. People can write a story or direct a film but good storytellers are harder to come by.
  • Humor is steeped in wit and/or intelligent physical comedy rather than crudeness or making fun of others
  • Ignites the imagination
  • Lacks vulgarity
  • All kinds of characters can be presented and is not worried about being overly politically correct or modern. We are worried less about what message a character is sending its readers and more worried about if the character is believable (IE: We love Byronic Heroes). We want to read people we recognize in the real world even if they’re in fantastical settings.
  • Focus on good characterization
  • Has something to say about the human condition. Read the classics – even the so-called “romances.” They all have something to say. From Anne of Green Gables to Jane Eyre to Pride and Prejudice and more.

It should be noted that while we love good, old-fashioned storytelling, we are putting a modern twist on it. We celebrate and appreciate equality and diversity. What we’re looking for is good writing using elevated language to express the writer’s truth rather than crass and explicit contemporary realism. We strive to include content that has PG-13 “like” content or below, minus a few exceptions for artistic merit and/or genre interest. However, these exceptions are made very selectively and depends on the overall “feel” of the story.

WHAT CATEGORIES DO WE COVER?
beauty and the beast 2014;

Photo: Pathé

The Silver Petticoat Review’s focus is on all of the categories from Literature, Film, Theater and Television listed below (though each story within these categories must also have elements of old-fashioned romance and/or old-fashioned storytelling for us to cover it):

  • Period Drama and Historical Fiction
  • Classics
  • Genre
    • Supernatural (IE: Monster Literature)
    • Fantasy
    • Romantic Fantasy
    • Urban Fantasy
    • Paranormal Romance
    • Magical Realism
    • Fairy Tales
    • Folklore, Fables
    • Sci-fi
    • Time Travel
    • Dystopian
    • Steampunk
    • Space Opera
    • Adventure
    • Gothic
  • Literary Fiction or Intelligent Drama/Comedy
  • Brit Lit
  • Epic
  • Suspense/Psychological Thriller (think Hitchcock)
  • Romantic Suspense
  • Historical Mystery
  • Cozy Mysteries
  • Historical Romance
  • Contemporary Romance
  • Romantic Comedies
  • Other Romantic Categories not already mentioned
  • Autobiography/Biography/Memoir (typically about literary/film/historical figures rather than modern political ones)
  • Non-Animated Feel-Good Movies (IE: A Hallmark Movie)
  • Religious Fiction (within our categories of interest)
  • YA Literature, Films or Shows (within our categories of interest)
  • Female-Driven
  • Animation: Classic Disney, female-driven, romantic, or based on folklore/fairy tales
  • Content with Byronic Heroes
  • Independent Films (that fit within our categories of interest)
  • International (IE: K-Dramas)

Over time we have perfected, eliminated, added as necessary to fit what we love in these categories! But we felt “who” we were still wasn’t clear enough. Just listing these categories was still too broad. However, with the addition of our specialization in old-fashioned romance and old-fashioned storytelling, we feel this will no longer be the case. Because that was what we were always working to be.

Going forward on The Silver Petticoat Review there will typically be an element of old-fashioned romance and/or old-fashioned storytelling (as defined by us) in the Film, Book, TV Show, or Theater production in order for it to be covered by us.

WHY SHOULD YOU JOIN US?

Mick and Beth from Moonlight Photo: CBS

Mick and Beth from Moonlight
Photo: CBS

If you love old-fashioned romance found in Jane Austen productions or other period dramas, well-written books and films without all the f-bombs and explicit sex scenes, witty comedy (Oscar Wilde is our friend), a paranormal love story where the leading man is immortal and gives smoldering stares like Mr. Darcy, or even old-fashioned romance of the sappy variety – like a Hallmark film, then join us in the discussion! We’re here to have fun and celebrate what we love. And hopefully, what you do too!

vintage girl reading

We want to bring back the joy we felt as kids when we read a good story.  Because, for us, reading or watching a story that inspires us or moves us, is what good storytelling is all about. We hope to find those stories and share them with you so all of our lives can be a little bit brighter and happier.

How much do you love old-fashioned romance and old-fashioned storytelling? Let us know in the comments! 


 

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Written by Amber Topping
Storyteller and Byronic Hero lover, Amber honed her storytelling skills as a girl by doing Shirley Temple impersonations and putting on plays with her twin sister. Eventually, she turned to cheerleading, dance and finally to writing and video editing. Amber is an empathetic and impassioned person with a strong independent will and a lot of creativity. She has a Humanities and Film degree from BYU, is co-creator of The Silver Petticoat Review and is also a contributing writer for various magazines. On top of magazine writing, Amber is also rewriting her screenplay "Prisoners of Glass," writing a TV pilot and working on a couple of novels.